Below example rotates video clockwise – use –rotate=”7″ to rotate counterclockwise.

handbrakeCLI -i inputfile.mp4 -f mp4 -e x264 -b 800 -w 568 -a 1 -E faac -B 96 -x level=4.0:ref=5:weightp=1:subq=2:mixed-refs=0:trellis=0:vbv-bufsize=25000:vbv-maxrate=20000:rc-lookahead=10 -v --rotate="4" --start-at duration:150 --stop-at duration:300 -o outputfile.mp4



To convert say all *.mp4 files in current directory to an already existing “out” directory (assuming in a bash shell);

for i in *.mp4;do handbrakeCLI -i $i -f mp4 -e x264 -b 800 -w 568 -a 1 -E faac -B 96 -x level=4.0:ref=5:weightp=1:subq=2:mixed-refs=0:trellis=0:vbv-bufsize=25000:vbv-maxrate=20000:rc-lookahead=10 -v --rotate="4" --start-at duration:150 --stop-at duration:300 -o out/$i;done



Note: “start at” indicates actual time or frame to start encoding and “stop at” indicates how many seconds or how many frames (from “start at”) to encode.

As at 15 November 2014

Doesn’t work
MX Player Pro 1.7.31
920 Text Editor 13.7.18

Works
Avast Mobile Security 4.0.7870
BS Player Free 1.19.173
Dolphin Browser 11.2.8
DroidEdit Free 1.22.5
ES File Explorer 3.2.2
Firewall Plus 4.0
FloatBattery 1.1.5
FloatClock 1.1.5
GSAM Battery Monitor 3.18
Live Traffic NSW 1.3.9
Mantano Reader Premium 2.5.1.7
PlayerPro 2.92
Pocket 5.7
Power Toggles 5.6.1
QuickPic 3.8
Reduce Photo Size 1.0.24
Root Explorer 3.2
Sidebar Launcher 3.3 (Volume Up/Down Functions not working)
SuperSU 2.20
Timely 1.2.10
Titanium Backup 6.2.0
Trickster Mod 2.13.946
TripGo 4.0.2.5
Twilight 3.9
ZArchiver 0.7.1

sudo pacman -S connman
sudo systemctl stop netctl
sudo systemctl disable netctl
sudo systemctl stop dhcpcd
sudo systemctl disable dhcpcd
sudo systemctl enable connman
sudo systemctl start connman
reboot
connmanctl > enable wifi
connmanctl > scan wifi
connmanctl > agent on
connmanctl > services (then copy wifi hash of your SSID)
connmanctl > quit
sudo touch /var/lib/connman/<SSID>-psk.config
sudo <your editor of choice> /var/lib/connman/<SSID>-psk.config
containing;

[service_wifi_<connman wifi hash of your SSID>]
Type = wifi
Name = <SSID>
Passphrase = <ASCII Passphrase>

… then quit editor/save file

connmanctl > scan wifi
connmanctl > services (and you’ll note an “AO” next to your SSID i.e.
already connected – wifi will be auto enabled upon boot from now on)

Disclaimer:
Custom unwarranted kernels are provided on an “as is basis” – use at your own risk. Steps below also assumes you know how to restore your kernel in case not working. Suggest to only use kernels compiled for your current distribution/version.

Note: this kernel is custom built/tailored for the Toshiba NB205 and will not work properly for any other PC’s/laptops (although it should work for machines with similar hardware)

.config
kernel headers and image

To use/install
1. Extract to any directory using 7-Zip
2. Open terminal window
3. cd {extracted directory)
4. sudo pacman -U *linux-zen-nb-head*3.15.8*.xz
5. sudo pacman -U *linux-zen-nb-3.15.8*.xz
6. Edit kernel command line (either directly in /etc/default/grub or /etc/grub.d/40_custom assuming using Grub2) per below

Comment out the following lines i.e. add a “#” in front

#kernel /boot/vmlinuz-linux root=/dev/disk/by-uuid/<boot drive id> loglevel=3 ro quiet resume=/dev/disk/by-uuid/<swap drive id>
#initrd /boot/initramfs-linux.img

Add following below commented line
kernel /boot/vmlinuz-linux-zen-nb root=/dev/<boot drive partition> loglevel=3 ro quiet resume=/dev/<swap drive partition>

Example
kernel /boot/vmlinuz-linux-zen-nb root=/dev/sda3 loglevel=3 ro quiet resume=/dev/sda6

7. Rebuild your grub menu
8. Reboot and enjoy

If your system kernel panics / doesn’t boot
1. Assuming using GRUB2 – select the default ArchBang kernel boot entry at GRUB2 screen then press “E”. Scroll down to the “kernel…” line. Change the kernel name back to vmlinuz-linux and on the next line type initrd /boot/initramfs-linux.img then press “Ctrl-X” to reboot
2. Undo the changes made to /etc/default/grub or /etc/grub.d/40_custom and rebuild grub menu

To uninstall completely
1. Boot into any other kernel
2. Open terminal window
3. sudo pacman -R linux-zen-nb-headers
4. sudo pacman -R linux-zen-nb
5. Undo changes to /etc/default/grub or /etc/grub.d/40_custom, rebuild grub menu per above then reboot

Patches:
http://liquorix.net/sources/3.15.8-1.patch.gz

Note:
Kernel defaults to using BFS CPU scheduler and CFQ IO scheduler.
Add elevator=bfq in kernel command line to use BFQ IO scheduler instead without recompiling.

Credits to:
Damentz for liquorix/zen patch; Nigel Cunningham for TuxOnIce patch; Pappy (Kernel Seeds) for initial .config seed; dieghen89 (kernel-netbook project) for BFQ tip.

Disclaimer:
Custom unwarranted kernels are provided on an “as is basis” – use at your own risk. Steps below also assumes you know how to restore your kernel in case not working. Suggest to only use kernels compiled for your current distribution/version.

Note: this kernel is custom built/tailored for the Toshiba NB205 and will not work properly for any other PC’s/laptops (although it should work for machines with similar hardware)

.config
kernel headers and image

To use/install
1. Extract to any directory using 7-Zip
2. Open terminal window
3. cd {extracted directory)
4. sudo pacman -U *linux-zen-nb-head*3.15.3*.xz
5. sudo pacman -U *linux-zen-nb-3.15.3*.xz
6. Edit kernel command line (either directly in /etc/default/grub or /etc/grub.d/40_custom assuming using Grub2) per below

Comment out the following lines i.e. add a “#” in front

#kernel /boot/vmlinuz-linux root=/dev/disk/by-uuid/<boot drive id> loglevel=3 ro quiet resume=/dev/disk/by-uuid/<swap drive id>
#initrd /boot/initramfs-linux.img

Add following below commented line
kernel /boot/vmlinuz-linux-zen-nb root=/dev/<boot drive partition> loglevel=3 ro quiet resume=/dev/<swap drive partition>

Example
kernel /boot/vmlinuz-linux-zen-nb root=/dev/sda3 loglevel=3 ro quiet resume=/dev/sda6

7. Rebuild your grub menu
8. Reboot and enjoy

If your system kernel panics / doesn’t boot
1. Assuming using GRUB2 – select the default ArchBang kernel boot entry at GRUB2 screen then press “E”. Scroll down to the “kernel…” line. Change the kernel name back to vmlinuz-linux and on the next line type initrd /boot/initramfs-linux.img then press “Ctrl-X” to reboot
2. Undo the changes made to /etc/default/grub or /etc/grub.d/40_custom and rebuild grub menu

To uninstall completely
1. Boot into any other kernel
2. Open terminal window
3. sudo pacman -R linux-zen-nb-headers
4. sudo pacman -R linux-zen-nb
5. Undo changes to /etc/default/grub or /etc/grub.d/40_custom, rebuild grub menu per above then reboot

Patches:
http://liquorix.net/sources/3.15.3-1.patch.gz

Note:
Kernel defaults to using CFQ IO scheduler.
Add elevator=bfq in kernel command line to use BFQ IO scheduler instead without recompiling.

Credits to:
Damentz for liquorix/zen patch; Nigel Cunningham for TuxOnIce patch; Pappy (Kernel Seeds) for initial .config seed; dieghen89 (kernel-netbook project) for BFQ tip.

Disclaimer:
Custom unwarranted kernels are provided on an “as is basis” – use at your own risk. Steps below also assumes you know how to restore your kernel in case not working. Suggest to only use kernels compiled for your current distribution/version.

Note: this kernel is custom built/tailored for the Toshiba NB205 and will not work properly for any other PC’s/laptops (although it should work for machines with similar hardware)

.config
kernel headers and image

To use/install
1. Extract to any directory using 7-Zip
2. Open terminal window
3. cd {extracted directory)
4. sudo pacman -U *linux-zen-nb-head*3.14.6*.xz
5. sudo pacman -U *linux-zen-nb-3.14.6*.xz
6. Edit kernel command line (either directly in /etc/default/grub or /etc/grub.d/40_custom assuming using Grub2) per below

Comment out the following lines i.e. add a “#” in front

#kernel /boot/vmlinuz-linux root=/dev/disk/by-uuid/<boot drive id> loglevel=3 ro quiet resume=/dev/disk/by-uuid/<swap drive id>
#initrd /boot/initramfs-linux.img

Add following below commented line
kernel /boot/vmlinuz-linux-zen-nb root=/dev/<boot drive partition> loglevel=3 ro quiet resume=/dev/<swap drive partition>

Example
kernel /boot/vmlinuz-linux-zen-nb root=/dev/sda3 loglevel=3 ro quiet resume=/dev/sda6

7. Rebuild your grub menu
8. Reboot and enjoy

If your system kernel panics / doesn’t boot
1. Assuming using GRUB2 – select the default ArchBang kernel boot entry at GRUB2 screen then press “E”. Scroll down to the “kernel…” line. Change the kernel name back to vmlinuz-linux and on the next line type initrd /boot/initramfs-linux.img then press “Ctrl-X” to reboot
2. Undo the changes made to /etc/default/grub or /etc/grub.d/40_custom and rebuild grub menu

To uninstall completely
1. Boot into any other kernel
2. Open terminal window
3. sudo pacman -R linux-zen-nb-headers
4. sudo pacman -R linux-zen-nb
5. Undo changes to /etc/default/grub or /etc/grub.d/40_custom, rebuild grub menu per above then reboot

Patches:
http://liquorix.net/sources/3.14.6-1.patch.gz

Note:
Kernel defaults to using CFQ IO scheduler.
Add elevator=bfq in kernel command line to use BFQ IO scheduler instead without recompiling.

Credits to:
Damentz for liquorix/zen patch; Nigel Cunningham for TuxOnIce patch; Pappy (Kernel Seeds) for initial .config seed; dieghen89 (kernel-netbook project) for BFQ tip.

Disclaimer:
Custom unwarranted kernels are provided on an “as is basis” – use at your own risk. Steps below also assumes you know how to restore your kernel in case not working. Suggest to only use kernels compiled for your current distribution/version.

Note: this kernel is custom built/tailored for the Toshiba NB205 and will not work properly for any other PC’s/laptops (although it should work for machines with similar hardware)

.config
kernel headers and image

To use/install
1. Extract to any directory using 7-Zip
2. Open terminal window
3. cd {extracted directory)
4. sudo pacman -U *linux-zen-nb-head*3.14.2*.xz
5. sudo pacman -U *linux-zen-nb-3.14.2*.xz
6. Edit kernel command line (either directly in /etc/default/grub or /etc/grub.d/40_custom assuming using Grub2) per below

Comment out the following lines i.e. add a “#” in front

#kernel /boot/vmlinuz-linux root=/dev/disk/by-uuid/<boot drive id> loglevel=3 ro quiet resume=/dev/disk/by-uuid/<swap drive id>
#initrd /boot/initramfs-linux.img

Add following below commented line
kernel /boot/vmlinuz-linux-zen-nb root=/dev/<boot drive partition> loglevel=3 ro quiet resume=/dev/<swap drive partition>

Example
kernel /boot/vmlinuz-linux-zen-nb root=/dev/sda3 loglevel=3 ro quiet resume=/dev/sda6

7. Rebuild your grub menu
8. Reboot and enjoy

If your system kernel panics / doesn’t boot
1. Assuming using GRUB2 – select the default ArchBang kernel boot entry at GRUB2 screen then press “E”. Scroll down to the “kernel…” line. Change the kernel name back to vmlinuz-linux and on the next line type initrd /boot/initramfs-linux.img then press “Ctrl-X” to reboot
2. Undo the changes made to /etc/default/grub or /etc/grub.d/40_custom and rebuild grub menu

To uninstall completely
1. Boot into any other kernel
2. Open terminal window
3. sudo pacman -R linux-zen-nb-headers
4. sudo pacman -R linux-zen-nb
5. Undo changes to /etc/default/grub or /etc/grub.d/40_custom, rebuild grub menu per above then reboot

Patches:
http://liquorix.net/sources/3.14.2-1.patch.gz

Note:
Kernel defaults to using CFQ IO scheduler.
Add elevator=bfq in kernel command line to use BFQ IO scheduler instead without recompiling.

Credits to:
Damentz for liquorix/zen patch; Nigel Cunningham for TuxOnIce patch; Pappy (Kernel Seeds) for initial .config seed; dieghen89 (kernel-netbook project) for BFQ tip.